I think my parent nees care, what do I do?

The Aged Care Process

Dealing with Transition

What feelings might someone experience when they move into a rest home?

What lifestyle changes might a person have when they move into a rest home?

Mum has to move into a rest home. How can we help her cope with the change?

What feelings might someone experience when they move into a rest home?

People who move into rest homes experience a mix of feelings.

The most positive feeling is an enhanced sense of security. In rest homes, residents day to day needs are well looked after.

Many residents struggle with sadness, partly caused by chronic pain or illness. Many think that going to a rest home is the final phase of life.

Many suffer from grief from what they had to give up. This includes personal property, who they live and interact with, companion pets, and neighbourhood friends.

Support your parent by reminding them of happy memories and enjoyable hobbies. If your parent is depressed, talk to the facility manager about counselling options. The issue is familiar to them, and they have resources to help your parent cope.

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What lifestyle changes might a person have when they move into a rest home?

The most positive change is that their day to day needs are well looked after. Many are relieved because they had struggled with living at home. They worry less about potential problems and difficulties.

Many residents like the companionship provided at a rest home. They develop close friendships with the residents. They could not have these relationships outside the home. Residents understand life in a nursing home, and can be a great source of support.

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Mum has to move into a rest home. How can we help her cope with the change?

Before your mother moves into care, talk to her about any concerns or questions she has about moving into care.

Ask the rest home if your mother can come for morning tea or lunch before she moves in.

Stay at the rest home for several hours on admission day. Walk around the rest home with your parent, and meet the staff and residents.

Bring your mother’s possessions, such as photos, furniture, bedding and homemade crafts by grandchildren. This will help her view the rest home as her own home. Ask the manager what you are allowed to bring.

Encourage your parent to keep up her previous interests. Talk to the activities co-ordinator about your mother’s interests, and see if she can continue them at the home.

Help your parent keep up previous contacts in the community. This can be done by using phone calls, Skype or emails.

Visit your mother regularly while she is settling in.

If your mother is having trouble settling into the home, contact a Social Worker or a counsellor. They have the skills to help your mother deal with the transition.

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